27 September 2012

Artists To Watch - Jeremy Lepisto

It is our conviction that the people with the best eye for artistic talent are other artists. So for a new set of (seemingly randomly placed) ongoing blog postings titled “Artists To Watch”, we asked working artists which artists they have been watching or been influenced by. 
The profiles that follow will reflect a broad, international and quirky selection - there are some incredible choices notable in the variety of approaches represented. 
Our first profile is of an artist that was born in Fairfax, Virginia, and was recently named a “Rising Star” by the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass - Jeremy Lepisto.
Jeremy Lepisto is a glass artist who has recently relocated to Canberra, Australia from Portland, Oregon. He creates works that have both physical and conceptual depth in his artwork through the layering of imagery. Jeremy received his BFA in glass and metals from Alfred University in 1997. He also recently completed serving 7.5 years on the Board of Directors for the Glass Art Society (GAS). 

In 2001, he co-founded Studio Ramp with his wife and fellow artist Mel George. Mel was appointed Artistic Programs Manager at Canberra Glassworks in 2009. Her narrative work will be featured in another posting. Jeremy and Mel teach a number of glass techniques at glass centers around the world; in 2005, I was part of their "Imagery in Glass" at Urban Glass in Brooklyn, where they outlined the sgraffito frit powder drawing technique. Jeremy is currently a studio artist and candidate for a PhD in Sculpture at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia.
Jeremy Lepisto and Mel George at the 2012 GAS Conference
Jeremy utilizes glass to "highlight the simple components and ordinary workings of everyday situations to capture the complex in the common." His forms are minimal and often contain renderings of architectural structures, landscapes and people. Some of these works will focus on what Jeremy calls, "a detailed idea in juxtaposition to its general surrounding."
Finding inspiration in the silhouettes and lines of urban architecture, including obsolete water towers and the tangle of city power lines, Jeremy’s work encourages us to question and re-look at the surroundings we usually take for granted. Said Jeremy of his work: “…I try to highlight the ordinary components and simple workings of everyday life and situations to capture the complex in the common. I strive to create from these themes my own objects that have an intricacy of construction yet yield a result of seamless simplicity.” 
Jeremy Lepisto, "LAST SCENE" - kilnformed glass, 2004 (26"h x 5"w x 3"d)
from Jeremy's "Tower Series"

Jeremy’s painted, fused and coldworked glass sculptures speak of the everyday scenes, landscapes and spaces we all share. His detailed landscapes are constructed into three-dimensional forms to achieve great visual depth and a distinct perspective.
Jeremy Lepisto "Without Meeting", from his "Bridge Series"
Jeremy Lepisto "Without Meeting" detail 
click HERE to jump to Jeremy's description of the background to the series.
Jeremy integrates a unique mix of enamel painting and frit powder “sgraffito” drawing technique in his work – as demonstrated in this short video of his process. Click on arrow image below to play.

video
A number of Jeremy's recent series references his relocation to Australia - and the process of building a new stage in life.The works from his "CrateSeries" depict and address "the want for goods that are un-order-able, un-receivable and/or undeliverable."

Jeremy Lepisto, "Reach", photo by Rob Little
25"t x 16.5"w x 23.5"l
He clearly understands the demands and challenges of fused glass with his use of layers upon layers. Jeremy said that he is currently hunkered down working on his PhD in Sculpture. We look forward to seeing how his work will evolve!

25 September 2012

Who's A Hottie?

Robert Kincheloe's a hottie - over 200 °F (100°C)!
Kiln casting large forms can test the limits of the size of the kilns the glass is being fired inside. Very large glass forms can require more glass than the mold's reservoir can hold at one time, requiring that additional glass be added during the firing process to fill the mold to the top with glass. Tim Tate is creating a new series - his "Cabinet of Curiosities" and some of the figures are very large.
Tim Tate's cast glass figures are sometimes over 20"H of solid cast glass. 




Audrey Wilson and Robert Kincheloe suit up to "charge" the flower pot reservoirs inside the hot kilns. 
Audrey gets ready to add the pre-chopped Bullseye glass pieces into the red-hot kiln.
Rob opens the heavy kiln lid and Audrey moves in quickly.
Audrey slides in the glass into the flower pots.
The process is repeated a number of times, each time allowing the kilns to return to hot temps and the green suited elves to cool down.
Rob and Audrey are literally smoking hot artists!
Tim's work will be featured at Chicago's S.O.F.A. Art Fair this November in Habatat Galleries space.

21 September 2012

Sean Hennessey at GooDBuddY Gallery



Sean Hennessey, "Pool of Tears" detail, kilncast glass, paint, integrated video. 24"x12"
For the last few months, sculptor Sean Hennessey been working on a series of pieces for a solo show - Reimagining Alice: A MixedMultimedia Series Based On Alice In Wonderland.
Sean Hennessey creates sculptures in glass and concrete that are narratives based on mythologies, religions, personal experiences and whimsy. By using imagery of common and slightly nostalgic items Hennessey tells narratives of hopes and dreams, and of memories and transformations. 
Sean Hennessey,  "Killing Time and Times Revenge" (detail and full image), glass, concrete, found objects, paint, wood, integrated video components
A graduate of the unique Berea College, Sean worked in professional theater for 10 years as a welder, carpenter, rigger, scenic artist, prop artist, and designer all the while creating his own artwork. Sean has been with the Washington Glass School since 2004 when Tim Tate finally convinced him that glass was cool.
Sean Hennessey reviews the cast glass panel fresh out of the kiln. After the annealed panel cools, Sean works the panel with concrete and paints.
Hennessey’s sculptures are kiln formed slump cast glass panels that he trowels and paints with concrete and stains. His works have a feeling of relics, of archeology, and of the study of the past.
Sean Hennessey "The Tweedles" (detail) kilncast glass, paint, EL panel lighting.
24" x 12"
Said Hennessey of the new works being installed his solo show “I wanted to start with the fun, absurdist, creative stories of Lewis Carroll's tale, using my own imagery, visual language and loose interpretations, riddled with a personal take on metaphors and combine that with materials I have been using and with materials that are very new to me. The desire to include video and lighting in my work was the original impetus for this project”. 
Sean Hennessey "Finding The Right Key" (detail) kilnfired glass, concrete, paint, EL panel lighting.
 “I equate the concrete with the realities of earth, and life, and the shell that we use to protect ourselves from exposing our soul to the world" Hennessey said his use of unusual medias not normally associated with fine art. "I've been combining glass, paint, steel, wood, concrete, found objects, stencils,  LED's, electroluminescent lighting (EL) and video. All the fun stuff."
Sean Hennessey, "Pool of Tears" (with image detail), kilncast glass, paint, steel, wood, integrated video component
The series was funded, in part, from a grant Hennessey received from the District of Columbia's Commission on the Arts and Humanities and will be hosted by the architecture firm Weibenson and Dorman in the 410 Goodbuddy Gallery.
Hennessey is one of the artists involved in the renovation of the entry doors of the Library of Congress’ Adams Building by the Architect of the Capitol, now under production. One of the East Coast’s leading mold makers, Hennessey has been taking castings of the landmark’s historic bronze doors as part of the process in translating the relief sculptures into cast glass for the building entry.
Sean Hennessey, "Drink Me" (detail)
Sean Hennessey: Reimagining Alice
A MixedMultimedia Series Based On Alice In Wonderland
September 28th - October 26, 2012
Opening Reception Friday, September 28th, from 5-8 PM
410 Florida Avenue, NW, Washington, DC

410 GooDBuddY is an exhibition space can that can be used by a single artist to exhibit their works. It is within the FRINJ neighborhood of Washington, DC, and is partially provided by Wiebenson & Dorman Architects whose studio is located in the same building.

15 September 2012

National Liberty Museum Auction & Glass Weekend


The National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, PA invites you to their Glass Weekend, Thursday, September 27– Sunday, September 30, 2012.
The itinerary for the weekend will include four days of fun visiting galleries, studios, private collections and national treasures. The museum will also honor five distinguished leaders in the glass art community at the Friday Night Awards Dinner: collectors Inna & Alex Friedman, collectors Shelby & Robert Ford and artist Therman Statom. 
The headline event of the weekend will be the Liberty Museum's huge Glass Auction on Saturday evening, September 29. They have assembled a prestigious collection of work representing the most renowned artists in the glass art world, as well as many promising newcomers. 
Demetra Theofanous
Participants may choose to attend the entire weekend, which includes all meals, admission to all activities and transportation between activities; the Awards Dinner on Friday Night; or the Auction Gala on Saturday night.  
Erwin Timmers
Click HERE to jump to the Silent Auction artwork catalog. 
The Silent Auction items for the National Liberty Museum's 2012 Glass Now! Auction Gala are now online for preview and advance bidding. If you find something you just MUST have, each work has a Buy It Now price, which will guarantee you win!
Teddie Hathaway
The Silent Preview/Online Bidding will close on September 27... if you wish to Proxy Bid after that date, please email Scott Patria at spatria@libertymuseum.org or call 215-925-2800 x 136.

Click HERE to jump to the Live Auction catalog.
For more information on how to register please call Stephanie Lin  at 215-925-2800 x 135
or email Stephanie@libertymuseum.org


Your participation helps the museum continue its work:  preserving freedom and democracy by fostering good character and understanding for all people through education.   The money raised helps the museum touch the lives of more than 30,000 young people each year. Join by Registering here.

14 September 2012

Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum Opens Tim Tate & Marc Petrovic Exhibit

"Envy" Tim Tate and Marc Petrovic; Cast and Blown Glass, Metal, Video
The artist team of Tim Tate & Marc Petrovic are an artistic powerhouse duo! Tonight their exhibit "Glass Secessionism" opens at the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum.

GLASS SECESSIONISM

When:
 
Friday, September 14, 2012 - Sunday, January 6, 2013 

Where:
 
Project Room

For more than two decades, artists Tim Tate and Marc Petrovic have created some of the most striking and innovative works in glass today. Known for his distinctive fusion of new media with traditional glass techniques, Tim Tate cleverly incorporates audio and video apparatuses with found objects and blown and cast glass elements. Marc Petrovic’s blown and sculpted pieces evoke a timelessness and quiet elegance that captures the imagination. The centerpiece of this exhibition is Tate and Petrovic’s latest collaborative venture, The Deadly Sins, which visually depicts the traditional vices in contemporary times.
The Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum located at the Mesa Arts Center in downtown Mesa, Arizona opens a number of glass based exhibits  - click HERE to jump to the Museum's website. Mesa Arts Center, One East Main Street, Mesa, Arizona 85201

13 September 2012

Sneak Peek at Maurine Littleton Gallery Exhibit

This Friday, September 14, the art galleries in Georgetown's Book Hill (on upper Wisconsin Avenue in the antiques, library and museum district of Georgetown) kicks off the Fall Art Season with a Gallery Crawl from 6-8 PM. Click on the link to jump to the gallery association website: http://georgetowngalleries.com/

Maurine Littleton Gallery exhibits and represents leading contemporary artists in glass, metal, wood and ceramics - including Harvey Littleton, Dante Marioni, Dale Chihuly, Ginny Ruffner and others. For the start of the Fall Art Season, the gallery is showcasing Michael Janis, Allegra Marquart and Drew Storm Graham. 
I stopped by for a quick sneak peak when the artwork was just finished being installed on the two levels and they look great! 
Here are some quick snaps (forgive the quality of the cell phone camera) :
Allegra Marquart's new sandcarved glass panels showcase her quirky stories. Her work plays with the translucency of the glass medium so beautifully.
Drew Storm Graham's colorful, wild, 3-D panels grab your attention!
Drew's work references tattoo and graffiti art - very fresh and powerful!
Michael Janis' panels look better than the photos - great depth to the pieces! Love the color!

This gallery crawl on Friday is a must!
Sept. 14 from 6 to 8 p.m. 
Georgetown Galleries around the intersection of Wisconsin Avenue and Reservoir Road
Other Georgetown Galleries and featured exhibits include:
ADDISON/RIPLEY FINE ARTS, GALERIE BLUE SQUARE, NEPTUNE FINE ART, ROBERT BROWN GALLERY, HEINER CONTEMPORARY and SUSAN CALLOWAY FINE ARTS.

12 September 2012

William Warmus Visits Washington Glass School

William Warmus is introduced to the audience in the Renwick's Grand Salon
The Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum held a lecture Grand Salon as part of its celebration of 50th anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement. 
L-R Toots Zynsky, William Warmus, Matthew Szösz
Author, independent curator and glass expert William Warmus moderated a conversation about the past, present, and future of studio glass between veteran glass artist Toots Zynsky and artist Matthew Szösz.  Matt's work is part of the"40 under 40:Craft Futures" exhibit currently on view at the Renwick Gallery.
Matt Szösz at the opening of 40 Under 40. Photo by Smithsonian American Art Museum
William is the author of a dozen books including biographies of Tiffany, Lalique, and Chihuly. He was also a curator at the Corning Museum of Glass and was the editor of Glass magazine, faculty member and visiting artist at the Pilchuck Glass School, and executive secretary of the Glass Art Society. William is a member of the Collections Committee of the Museum of Glass (Tacoma) and a board member of the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass. The New York Times has described him as a "Stylemaker". The WGS blog has quoted often from William's writings on the subject of Studio Art Glass, including his seminal essay on the end of the glass movement "The End?".
After the lecture at the Smithsonian, William visited the Washington Glass School and chatted with the artists in the studio.
William Warmus takes photos of Erwin Timmers' artwork.
William said this about the Washington Glass School: "It's better than I thought it'd be...it's not as bad as it could've been". High praise indeed.
It was great to be able to meet and chat and have William share his unique perspective on the art scene with us, and he has promised to return!

11 September 2012

In Memoriam 9-11


10 September 2012

Trawick Prize Winners Announced


"Just Not Enough" By Dave D'Orio; scooter, found objects, glass syringes, silvered glass water jugs
Bethesda Contemporary Art’s Trawick Prize is a visual art prize produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District that honors artists from Maryland, Washington, D.C. and Virginia. The annual juried competition awards $14,000 in prize money to selected artists and features the work of the finalists in a group exhibition. The 2012 exhibition is at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD, and it runs through Sept 29th.  The public opening reception will be held Friday, Sept 14 from 6-9 pm in conjunction with the Bethesda Art Walk.
Baltimore artist Lillian Bayley Hoover was awarded “Best in Show” on Wednesday, Sept 5 at a special reception that named the winners of the Trawick Prize. Hoover won $10,000 for her oil painting based on a photograph of a scale model Pergamon Altar in the ancient Greek city of Pergamon, in modern day Turkey.
"Feeder 301" By Dave D'Orio Artwork photos by AnythingPhotographic
Mount Rainier artist Dave D'Orio won second place for his mixed media glass sculptures. David frequently uses found objects, blown glass and industrial materials to crate symbolic imagery. He uses duplication, repetition, and an emphasis on material to evoke the feeling of factory mass-produced objects and of hyper technology. Dave’s imagery is a mix of the metaphoric, absurd and ironic and possesses an enviable ability to attract and repel the viewer. Dave does not explain every element in his sculpture - he says he likes viewers to draw their own conclusions about the "possible purpose and unstated problem the artwork would address".
When asked about what receiving the Trawick Prize means to him, Dave said  " My work can be seen as "challenging" and its not what most people think of as beautiful - its really great to have my work seen in this prestigious setting; to also have it awarded is incredible".
 
Dave D'Orio in his studio. Photo by AnythingPhotgraphic




David is the executive director of DC GlassWorks, a glass blowing facility in Hyattsville, MD. His work has been shown at Artomatic in Crystal City, the Marlboro Gallery of Prince George’s Community College and last year was part of the Arlington Arts Center Solos. At this past Artomatic, the James Renwick Alliance gave Dave's installation sculpture its 'Award of Recognition'.

The 2012 Trawick Finalists included:
Lillian Bayley Hoover, Baltimore, MD; David D’Orio, Mt. Rainier, MD; Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.; Hannah Walsh, Richmond, VA; Skye Gilkerson, Baltimore, MD; Nate Larson, Baltimore, MD; Joshua Wade Smith, Baltimore, MD; Diane Szczepaniak, Potomac, MD

Congratulations to the 2012 Winners!

1st Place, $10,000 - Lillian Bayley Hoover, Baltimore, MD
2nd  Place, $2,000 - David D’Orio, Mt. Rainier, MD
3rd  Place, $1,000 - Dean Kessmann, Washington, D.C.
Young Artist Award, $1,000 - Hannah Walsh, Richmond, VA
Carol Trawick with David D’Orio and Catherine Leggett. Photo courtesy Bethesda Urban Partnership
The 2012 Trawick Prize jury included Dawn Gavin, Associate Professor in Drawing and Foundations at the University of Maryland, College Park; B. Kelly Gordon, Associate Curator at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.; and N. Elizabeth Schlatter, Deputy Director and Curator of Exhibitions at the University of Richmond Museums, Virginia.