30 September 2013

History and Evolution of Studio Glass Lecture Oct 5th

© Erwin Eisch / CMOG
Whats going on in the photo above? 
Is it a new 8 member boy band created from TV show "X Factor"? No.
Still photo from the latest sequel to a Hollywood slasher/gore film? Nope.
Some Portland hipsters gathering at a coffee café that doubles as a low-carbon-footprint bike shop? Wrong Again.

European glass innovator Erwin Eisch made the 8 mold blown works as a tribute to Harvey Littleton in 1976. Eisch’s non-traditional approach to glassmaking had a profound impact during the formative years of the American Studio Glass movement, and his relationship with American glass pioneer Harvey K. Littleton forged an important link between European and American studio artists working in glass. 

Want to know more about the history of Studio Glass? This Saturday, October, 5, from 1 pm, the Debra Ruzinsky of the Washington Glass School will talk and show images presenting a  broad international survey rooted in the early days of studio work. Works by artists Sybren Valkema,  Edris Eckhardt, Michael and Francis Higgins, Libensky and Brychtova, Ann Wolff, Erwin Eisch, Kyohei Fujita, Vera Liskova, to name a few early & influential artists -- such as female glass artist Asa Brandt, who has been called the "Harvey Littleton of Sweden".

This free talk is a great way to know who and where glass has come as we move boldly into a new future of the medium.
BLUE MADONNA by Ann Wolff
What Came Before / A Slide History Of The Studio Glass Movement
Lecturer : Debra Ruzinsky 
When : Saturday,October 5th  
From:1 pm
Cost : Free of charge...RSVP to: washglassschool@aol.com
Where: Washington Glass School
             3700 Otis Street, Mount Rainier, MD 20712
Oh, and the titles of the Erwin Eisch heads:
(A) Littleton the Gentleman: mirrored inside, with glasses, with marble base. (B) Littleton the Poet: with glasses and beanie. (C) Littleton the Teacher: mirrored inside, glassblower painted on right side of head; set on square black base. (D) Littleton, Man of Frauenau: cold painted in facial area and around base with scene of town. (E) Littleton the Worker: applied band of colorless glass across nose and around head, square black base. (F) Littleton's Headache: painted with bandages surrounding head and chin area, etched in other areas, square black base. (G) Littleton the Fragile. (H) Littleton's Spirit: with collar and tie.

27 September 2013

Public Art - Panel Discussion with National and DC Area Agencies Tonight

"Public Art Concepts: An Exhibit of Proposals" Opening and Panel Discussion @ Joe's Movement Emporium
“Public Art Concepts” gives the public an opportunity to engage with the artist in a behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to create artwork for a public space. Given the growing interest in and number of street murals and 3-D public artworks, “Public Art Concepts” paves the way for a focused dialogue about what it means to create an arts district and how this change begins with the artist. The exhibit features scale models and proposals for public art works by regional and national artists who have applied for grants and commissions, some of which were awarded and others not. Opening night features a lively panel of participating artists and reps from funding agencies that have diverse experience in the public art arena.

Opening: (Tonight)Friday September 27, 2013 at 7:00 pm. Closing November 22, 2013
Coordinated by Alonzo Davis | Curated by Nehemiah Dixon III

Opening night features a lively panel of participating artists and reps from funding agencies that have diverse experience in the public art arena. Panel Coordinated by Anne L’Ecuyer, Arts Management faculty at American University.

Panel:

Joes Movement Emporium, 3309 Bunker Hill Rd, Mt Rainier, MD 20712

RSVP via Facebook link HERE

26 September 2013

"Common Discourse" at Pittsburgh's Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery


The beginning of the fall exhibition season opens Saturday, September 28, 2013, 5:30-8:30pm at Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery, 5833 Ellsworth Ave in Pittsburgh, PA.
Common Discourse features the work of Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous, Randy Walker and WGS co-director Michael Janis. 
“A non-themed show is always difficult to describe,” notes gallery owner and director Amy Morgan, “Yet, the common bond here is the intelligent and distinctive use of the glass medium - both decoratively and narratively - which defines this exhibition.” 

Common Discourse
September 28, 2013 - January 18, 2014
morgan contemporary glass gallery  
5833 Ellsworth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232
Hours are Tues. - Fri. 11 - 5 and Sat. 12 - 5, or by appt.

24 September 2013

Audrey Wilson's Work Selected for Midwest Exhibit

Recognizing the best from the Midwest, 28 glass artworks from 21 glass artists have been selected for this year’s Indiana Glass Arts Alliance (IGAA) annual exhibition.  Titled “GATHERING: Contemporary Glass from the Heartland,” the exhibition will open Oct. 19 at the Indiana University Kokomo Art Gallery and continue through Dec. 7. The exhibition is open to the public.
Audrey Wilson
This is the first time the IGAA has opened the exhibition to glass artists outside Indiana. 
Nearly 150 applications, from 48 glass artists in six states, were reviewed by a two-member jury panel.  Tom Riley, who for 30 years has owned Riley Galleries, in Cleveland, Ohio along with glass artist and director of the glass program at Kent State University, Sean Mercer, collaborated on selecting artwork for the exhibition.  The IGAA offers $2500 in total cash awards, and the Best in Show Award recipient will additionally receive the opportunity to be exhibited at Riley Galleries.
Indiana has one of the longest and most storied histories of glassmaking in the U.S., and it is appropriate that this year’s exhibition is in Kokomo, where Hoosier glassmaking began in 1888. 
The Indiana University Kokomo Art Gallery is located at 2300 South Washington Street, in Kokomo, Indiana.   Gallery hours are Tue. and Thu., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Wed., 10 a.m.- 8 p.m.; and Sat., noon – 4 p.m. 
Audrey Wilson

 WGS' Audrey Wilson (a native of Ohio) has two works selected to be included in what promises to be a great show.
ARTISTS WHOSE WORK WILL BE EXHIBITED
Tom Armbruster, Hudson, OH; Cortney Boyd, Carbondale, IL; Mathilde Brown Swanson, Des Moines; IA; Domenico Cavallaro, Cuyahoga Falls, OH; Steven Ciezki, Calumet City, IL; Cecile Derel, Chicago, IL; Davin Ebanks, Anderson, IN; Robert Geyer, Portage, OH; Francine Gourguechon, Chicago, IL; Jennifer Halvorson, Muncie, IN; Justin Kern, Muncie, IN; Sungsoo Kim, Kent, OH; Melissa Kistler, Indianapolis, IN; Joanna Manousis, Columbus, OH; Emily McBride, Louisville, KY; Matthew Paskiet, Holland, OH; Charlyn Reynolds, Elgin, IL; Kenny Sprinkle, Camby, IN; Timothy Stover, Kent, OH; Zac Weinberg, Columbus, OH; Audrey Wilson, Mt. Rainier, MD.
Congratulations Audrey!

23 September 2013

Time To Get (Glass) Schooled! Free Lecture on the History of Studio Glass

The Washington Glass School Presents a free lecture titled " What Came Before / A Slide History Of The Studio Glass Movement." The talk will be a broad international survey focusing on the early days of studio glass work.
Who was there, what they did, and why; in the US and abroad; male and female artists; people you may never have heard about!   

Perfect for Glass Seccessionistas who want to learn a bit of glass history that isn't just about the biggest names - this is a great chance to get the overview of the medium and provide new insights!


Lecturer : Debra Ruzinsky 

When : Saturday,October 5th  

From:1 pm

Cost : Free of charge...RSVP to: washglassschool@aol.com
Where: Washington Glass School
             3700 Otis Street, Mount Rainier, MD 20712

Debra Ruzinsky received her BA in Design from the University of California at Los Angeles, and her MFA in Glass Sculpture from RIT. She has been working in glass since 1982. She serves on the publications committee of the Glass Art Society, and was Visiting Asst. Professor of Glass at RIT for the 2008-2009 academic calendar year. Her work is part of the collection of the Seto City Museum in Seto, Japan, and the Glasmuseet Ebeltoft in Denmark, as well as the RIT Wallace Library Collection.

20 September 2013

Houston Fine Art Showcases @ Tim Tate at Habatat Galleries

Habatat Galleries sends some photos of their gallery space at Houston Fine Art Fair - now open thru Sept 22.
View of Habatat Galleries Space 504. Tim Tate's new cast glass and video works are on the right.
Tim Tate's "Moving Paintings" are quite the hit of the show!
Tim described his "Moving Paintings" as akin to Victorian paintings that move - a la Hogwarts.
Houston Fine Art
George R. Brown Convention Center
Houston, TX 77010

Sept 19 - 22, 2013

19 September 2013

US/UK Sister Cities: Keeping Calm & Carrying On

The UK delegation again stopped into the Washington Glass School to plot plan what could be done next to further interaction between Sister Cities Washington, DC and Sunderland, England. 
Washington Glass School Co-Director Michael Janis outlines bold plans to the Sunderland representatives. Clockwise from left: Erwin Timmers, Tim Tate, Michael Janis, Oliver "Skip" Dulle, Tom Hurst, Catherine Auld.
Some of the topics included artwork exhibitions - including Artomatic- of US/UK glass and ceramics in London, residencies in Washington, DC and in Sunderland, and some new ways to get the work of the media-based artists seen. 
The delegation also visited Flux Studios, where UK ceramic artist Philippa Whiteside is currently working on her artist residency - and was featured in the British Council USA blog today.
UK artist Philippa Whiteside working at Flux Studio.
Click HERE to jump to the British Council post. We will advise on US/UK art interactions when they develop!


18 September 2013

The Process: Shady Grove Hospital Glass Artwork

Earlier, the blog had posted about the commission of artwork from Washington Glass Studio to be installed in the chapel in Shady Grove Hospital's new Aqualino Cancer Care center. The artwork was recently installed - here is a look at the process:
Original design sketch
After the concept design, dimensions and glass techniques proposed was approved, the Washington Glass Studio team worked at getting the glass underway.
First, glass of the right size was needed. The glass triptych panels were 5'-0" long, much larger than the glass we had in the studio. Getting large shipments of glass and then (successfully) cutting the glass would be a project into themselves!
Erwin Timmers and Tim Tate receiving the large pane of sheet glass.
The process of cutting such a large sheet of glass involved many from the studio - just to keep the score line straight.
The glass is larger than the pair of work tables.

Erwin Timmers preps the glass for cutting.
The cutting crew: L-R Erwin Timmers, Michael Janis, Audrey Wilson.
After the glass is cut and cleaned, work inside the kilns proceeds. Audrey Wilson set beds of dry sifted plaster within the large kilns, and began creating the molds the glass would be melted into.
Audrey working on the glass mold that is set up in the kiln.
After firing, annealing and cooling the glass panels, the edges needed to be ground and polished smooth - a noisy messy job. 
Audrey takes to working outdoors to do the wet grinding.
Now the glass is ready for the site. Tim and Erwin traveled to the new cancer facility to install the glass panels into the steel slots that were previously set into a concrete plinth. The surrounding area to the glass panels will incorporate a rock garden.
Erwin Timmers and Tim Tate being installing the panels into the steel framework.
Artists Tim Tate and Erwin Timmers stop for a chat about the glass artwork.
The finished work from inside the Aqualino Cancer Center chapel.
 Adventist Healthcare's executive director of Cancer Care Services sent a note about the just installed artwork - she wrote to the Shady Grove Art Consultant Lillian Fitzgerald: "... I was in the ACC today and the whole stone and glass took my breath.  The glass is the most beautiful work I have ever seen.  Thank you for your vision..."

A great note to end the story of the process of the artwork!

17 September 2013

Jeremy Lepisto @ The Glass School - Crikey!

L-R Sean Hennessey, Michael Janis, Jeremy Lepisto talk glass. All glass - All the time.

Ex-pat glass artist Jeremy Lepisto was in the country - teaching at nearby Vitrum Glass Studio - and he stopped in for a visit at the Washington Glass School. The Australia based artist chatted all about glass, MFA's, the Glass Art Society, glass, Australia National University (ANU), glass art, studio space and glass gossip. Did I mention glass?
L-R Tim Tate, Jeremy Lepisto, and Vitrum Studio's Judith Conway.
Jeremy Lepisto and Sean Hennessey talk about Sean's cast glass & LED artwork.
Sean Hennessey's cast glass panel.

Great to see Jeremy! And as his visit was on the anniversary of his marriage to glass artist Mel George - it was an honor to have had him by on such a special day! As they say down under, She'll be right, Mate!

05 September 2013

Jewel Box Gallery Artist Reception Tonight!

The Jewel Box Pop Up Gallery is month-long exhibition featuring the work of 18 DC area artists.  Located in a former jewelry store, the expansive space will serve as an excellent temporary gallery showcasing a wide variety of styles and media.
Erin Atognoli
 List of artists showing at the Jewel Box:
 Erin Antognoli
Alan Binstock
Jo Ann Block
Stephen Boocks
Matt Carl
Alex Chiou
Kathy Hart
Joe Hicks
Tom Hill
Emily Hoxworth
David Hubbard
J’Nell Jordan
Ani Kasten
Courtnye Koivisto
Lisa Rosenstein
Casey Snyder
Jeffrey Trueblood
Laurie Tylec
Stephen Boocks
The Jewel Box is located at 3108 Queens Chapel Road in Hyattsville, MD (at the intersection where 34th Street in Mount Rainier becomes Chillum Road) in a strip mall with ample parking. The West Hyattsville Metro is a 15 minute walk away. 

Opening Reception is Thursday, September 5th from 7-9pm. The gallery will be open Thursdays and Fridays from 7-9pm and Saturdays from 1-5pm throughout the month of September.  

Art Lives Here and The Shops at Queens Chillum teamed up to launch a series of placemaking events that showcase the talents of Gateway Arts District artists in a multi-use shopping center located in Hyattsville, MD and on the border of Mount Rainier. The Shops at Queens Chillum are funding these programs and events, which directly support local artists. Jewel Box (Pop-Up) Gallery; designed and curated by John Paradiso and Tim McLoraine.

03 September 2013

10 years ago....I walked into Washington Glass School

The Washington Glass School was located on Half Street, SE from 2003 to 2005. It was part of the Washington Sculpture Center until the area was all claimed as part of the Washington National's baseball stadium. Not the poshest part of town back then.
I am interjecting a bit of personal story into the blog - in January of 2003, my wife and I moved to the USA after living 10 years in Australia, initially staying with my sister-in-law's family out in suburban Virginia. I wanted to educate myself to become a glass artist, and had been commuting from my Alexandria, to Baltimore, MD to blow glass. Without a car, this got old fast - real fast. In September of 2003, the second "Warm Glass Conference" was held in Arlington, VA, and since I planned on attending the seminars, I visited a number of the DC area glass facilities to see what glass courses were available locally. At the time, Washington Glass School was part of the Washington Sculpture Center, an organization that provided public access educational programs in sculpture. Wandering around Washington, DC, I discovered the practical aspects of DC's quadrant names (Northeast, Southeast, etc) - I was wandering around on the wrong Half Street - and I discovered the seamy underside of Capitol Hill. Just before the conference, I took a fused glass workshop that dealt with architectural applications of glass at the Washington Glass School, and was hooked.
This is a photo of me in my first fused glass class. L-R: Tyler Frisbee, Michael Janis (me), Kathryn Cosmos, Tim Tate.
Tim Tate and Erwin Timmers were the teachers and Jeff Zimmer was the teaching assistant (Jeff has since earned a MDES Glass & Architectural Glass, Edinburgh College of Art, Edinburgh, UK).  
This class dealt with aspects of fused glass and included kilnformed projects such as dry plaster casting. It was my first foray into kilnformed work - and that introduction shifted my thoughts and process to fused glass.
Erwin Timmers and Tim Tate at the Warm Glass Conference, September 2003.
Glass School Co-Founders Tim Tate and Erwin Timmers were part of the Warm Glass conference- leading a seminar on how to hang glass, and they brought the student castings to the glass school students that were attending. Shortly after, I became the studio's shop monkey, working every day and assisting at every class. By 2005 I was teaching the very kiln-forming glass class I had begun my journey in glass... ah, the circle of life...
Here I am teaching glass fusing class, October 2005.
The days became weeks; weeks into years, and by the time the Washington Glass School relocated to Mount Rainier, I had become a Co-Director. And still time marched on. Recently clearing out old file cabinets had me look thru old documents and class schedules, I came upon the 2003 class list and nostalgia hit. 10 years on - who'da thunk that events would unfold as they had!  
Anyhow - am still enjoying the ride - Cheers to all!

01 September 2013

Happy Labor Day!

Detail from artist Slate Grove's MFA exhibition "Everyday Heroes"
Glass artist and sculptor Slate Grove was named one of the 'Rising Stars" at Glass Weekend held at Wheaton Arts in Millville, NJ this past June. The Washington Glass School first met Slate when he was the Glass Studio Coordinator at Penland - around 2008. His glass tools fit the concept of Labor Day - intended to celebrate the economic and social contributions of workers.

From Slate's bio and artist statement: 
"Growing up in the blue-collar town of Fort Dodge, IA, I was surrounded by hard work. Gypsum mills, Limestone quarries, meat packing plants and trucking companies provided the majority of jobs in town. Like many Midwestern towns, there was no shortage of strong willed, physical folks with impeccable work ethic to fill those jobs. The town depended upon factory work and the workers depended on each other. Many in my family were displaced when Hormel closed its Fort Dodge plant in the 1980’s and, more recently, when Electrolux decided to move their Iowa operation to a facility in Mexico."

"My art work focuses on the fragility and the invisibility of those who do service jobs daily. I attempt to elevate the ghostly memories of the character of people who raised me and who, I feel, deserve our unending reverence."